About Raleigh

The history of Black people working at Raleigh Industries in Nottingham is one which demonstrates the power of community activism. Raleigh, established in 1887, is one of the world’s oldest and best-known bike brands. At its peak Raleigh produced 100,000 cycles, 250,000 hub gears, 15,000 motorcycles and 50,000 motorcycle gearboxes annually and despite the risingContinue reading “About Raleigh”

Densel Davy

DENSEL DAVY, from St. Mary, Castleton, Jamaica arrived in Nottingham in 1965. He began an apprenticeship at Raleigh in 1969, gradually progressing to the status of Deputy Chief Electrical Engineer before leaving in 1983. “I did a four-year training programme involving six-week blocks at college and six weeks at work. When I finished my apprenticeshipContinue reading “Densel Davy”

Lloyd Ferron

LLOYD FERRON, born in St Catherine, Jamaica arrived in Nottingham at the age of 14 in 1957. His first job after leaving school was working at Raleigh. He worked in the fender shop, putting fenders on Choppers and other bikes as they moved down the conveyor belt. “It was my first job when I finishedContinue reading “Lloyd Ferron”

Govern Murray

GOVERN MURRAY began working at Raleigh in 1968. He had just turned sixteen and newly arrived from Jamaica. He spent the next 37 years working until he was made redundant. By the time he had completed his time at Raleigh he was able to make a bicycle from start to finish.  “I did so many differentContinue reading “Govern Murray”

Nigel Sutherland

NIGEL SUTHERLAND found himself at Raleigh in 1970. He worked at Raleigh on two occasions and in total spent ten years working there “My first job was in the Ring Braze learning to put frames together. Then when I went back to Raleigh I worked in the finishing shop where the bikes were assembled andContinue reading “Nigel Sutherland”

David Sinclair

DAVID SINCLAIR joined Raleigh on a Youth Training Scheme around 1979. “I needed to get some work experience and to earn so that I could deal with everyday issues. I had a good spell there, but it wasn’t for me. I found it dirty and noisy and assembling bike parts on the production line wasn’tContinue reading “David Sinclair”

Howard Edwards

HOWARD EDWARDS started his time at Raleigh as a machine operator and then moved on to become a welder. He worked at Raleigh for approximately three years. “When I came to England my cousin gave me a Raleigh racer, it was a red one, really good. That bike meant so much to me because IContinue reading “Howard Edwards”

Winston Smellie

WINSTON SMELLIE worked on the production line in the finishing shop on Faraday Road for about 11 months before leaving. He was seventeen years old at the time. “Racism was rife back then. We would get really angry because nothing was done about it and sometimes it would develop into fights. They did nothing toContinue reading “Winston Smellie”

Roydon Allen

ROYDON ALLEN, on leaving school, was offered four opportunities of employment, one of which was at Raleigh. Allen’s mother was already an employee at the factory. His decision to become a Technician apprentice was influenced by the conditions he saw his mother working in. “I saw my mum in the press shop where there wasn’tContinue reading “Roydon Allen”

Winston Stewart

WINSTON STEWART worked at Raleigh on two occasions, the first being from 1976 to 1978. He later went back to Raleigh during the 1980s and by then there was a new department manufacturing the BMX bike. During his second stretch at Raleigh he was promoted as a trainer for trainees. “When I first worked at RaleighContinue reading “Winston Stewart”

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